Protect Yourself from the Arizona Sun with these Summer Skin Care Tips


Summer is here, which means dry, flaky skin. Explore these summer skin care tips to help you enjoy the Arizona summer.

Summer is here, is your skin ready?

Summer is officially in full swing, which often means dry, flaky skin. . There are a variety of summer skin care tips, ranging from sunscreen to taking lukewarm showers, that will protect your skin. However, too much ultraviolet radiation from the sun can damage your skin cells, resulting in sunburns, skin cancer, heat rashes, and more. Read on to learn how to properly care for your skin and enjoy summer in the Valley of the Sun.

How to Protect Your Skin During Summer

According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), one in five Americans will develop some form of skin cancer during their lifetime. Prolonged ultraviolet exposure — even in warmer months — may also lead to cataracts and premature aging of the skin like age spots, dryness, and wrinkles.

There are several steps you can take to protect yourself and your skin during the Arizona summer:

  • Wear sunscreen: Sunscreen helps fight against the harmful effects of the sun and reduces the risk of skin cancer, sunburns, and premature aging. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends wearing sunscreen regularly, even on cloudy days. Don’t forget about the lips, though. The lips are often a common site for skin cancer due to extended sun exposure. Look for lip-specific products that have SPF 30 or higher and apply every two hours or so, based on the amount of sun exposure. Additionally, if you decide to wear lipstick, use darker shades as they provide more protection from UV rays than glossy ones.
  • Drink plenty of water: Drinking water daily is essential in the heat of Arizona summers. Dehydration can lead to several complications, including dry and flaky skin. rink at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water every day, and increase your water intake if you plan to participate in any physical activities.
  • Take a cold shower: Give your skin a break in the summertime by taking cold or lukewarm showers. This helps retain moisture in your skin and l reduces the dryness you experience in hotter months.
    Wear protective clothing: Protective clothing can help shield your skin from the harsh effects of the sun. Wear sunglasses, wide-brimmed hats, and clothing made from light fabrics to help keep you cool.

Protect Yourself From the Inside, Out

Certain foods have been shown to help protect the skin from the dangerous effects of the sun’s UV rays. Blueberries, for example, contain a plant compound called anthocyanin that protects cells from UV damage. Red-colored fruits and vegetables also contain compounds that can combat the onset of skin cancers, as well as stimulate the skin’s ability to repair and rebuild itself naturally.

Healthline suggests healthy fats from flax seeds help skin cells maintain their strength and elasticity while providing a protective layer for your skin. It can also help treat certain skin conditions like dermatitis.

Lastly, swap coffee or tea for coconut water. It acts on the connective tissue in your skin to improve elasticity, eliminate dry skin, and age-related wrinkles — plus, it’s incredibly refreshing on hot summer days.

Talk with a physician at your nearby Valleywise Community Health Center to learn more summer skin care tips or call 1-833-VLLYWSE to schedule an appointment.

Sources:

  1. https://azbigmedia.com/lifestyle/consumer-news/dry-skin-tips-for-desert-dwellers/
  2. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/flaxseed-oil-benefits#section1
  3. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/287710
  4. https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/sun-safety.htm
  5. https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/resources-for-health-educators/eye-health-data-and-statistics/cataract-data-and-statistics
  6. https://www.aad.org/media/stats-skin-cancer

About the Author

Mansi Sarihan, MD - Dermatology

Dr. Mansi Sarihan is a District Medical Group physician and the chief of dermatology at Valleywise health. She is a board-certified dermatologist and completed her residency training at UC San Diego. She is faculty at Mayo clinic, University of Arizona, and Creighton University and is actively training dermatology residents and internal medicine residents. She currently sees patients via telehealth and in-person appointments.

Read more posts by Mansi Sarihan, MD  Browse all topics

Stay up to date and get notified of new posts.

Subscribe